Recently I made a cabbage salad, and it was terrible.

Really terrible. 

So, of course I had to make it again and get it right.

Thai Style Cabbage Salad

The problem in the first place was that while cabbage is great for summer, and summer people, it’s great because it is bitter. Ayurveda explains that bitter tasting foods combine the elements of space and air, which of course are cooling. These elements are also light, subtle, expansive – all qualities that help us maintain ease in the heat of August – and that is why I added so much of it. To cool down… 

But because bitter is so detoxifying, purifying, releasing, our bodies aren’t naturally drawn to that flavor. Instead, we are drawn to the taste that gives us strength and emotional ease, requisite qualities for our itinerant ancestors. What is that taste? You guessed it – sweet, of course. That is why we crave sweet tastes when we feel weak, physically or emotionally.

Interestingly, the deeper tissues in your body love sweet too, so Ayurveda has evolved formulas to combine the bitter taste with the sweet in order to drive the medicinal benefits of bitter into your deepest inner workings, where it can clean you out and power you up.

So after I took one bite of the salad, I was embarrassed. But on the second bite, I knew just what it needed: Something sweet.

Rice noodles were added, and the fix is delicious. It’s a sweet, summer noodle salad with much less cabbage now. I did keep the name Thai Cabbage Salad as I was going for a new way to enjoy that fabulously heat reducing, pitta-balancing, heart-healthy crisp purple brassica, that turns so lusciously pink when “quick fermented” and marinated in vinegar.

Thai Style Cabbage Salad Dressing

Feel free to use what you have on hand. For instance, if you don’t have coconut vinegar then use rice. Just know that coconut vinegar has a sweetness to it so it needs to be replaced with another mild vinegar. The ever more popular Apple Cider Vinegar would be too strong.

If your market doesn’t sell Persian cucumbers, use your favorites. Persian cucumbers have a thinner and less bitter skin, and it’s not waxy like the “regular ol” cucumbers. With a lovely economy of seeds, Persians are crispy without being watery, too. I only use these nowadays, but if you can’t find them, use the larger cukes and remove the seedy middle.

You can also replace the almond butter with another favorite nut butter. Peanut butter would be standard in Thai cooking, but I prefer almond butter for health and taste. With only 2 tablespoons, it gives a mild sweetness. You can certainly add another spoonful or two if you want to accentuate that nutty taste. Add another spoon of the soba water too for consistency.

You might like to add more garlic if you like pungency. On that note, I didn’t add any red pepper – which all true Thai dishes would include. But this is a summer salad, and summer is a season to reduce heat, especially internal heat. If you are feeling the heat these days, skip it. It doesn’t need it. But if you are “down under,” bravely trying a mostly raw salad in winter, or if you are one who generally runs cool with a slower metabolism, then by all means feel free to add a dash or two of your best red pepper flakes.

Finally, a true Thai dressing would have ginger. Again, it didn’t need it for taste, but if you are Vata, certainly add ginger – fresh or ground – and lots of it. In fact, if you are Vata, don’t bother cooling the noodles. Just toss it all together with the noodles freshly drained and enjoy it warm.

It takes no time to prepare, but be sure to get your cabbage in the vinegar for a quick ferment at least 4 hours before serving. One final note: I love using cilantro lately as a salad leaf, so I just trim away the stems. It’s fast and easy and it makes a more beautiful salad.

Thai Style Cabbage Salad

Thai Style Cabbage Salad

Ingredients

  • 1 cup purple cabbage, sliced thin
  • 1/4 cup coconut vinegar
  • 1 package rice or buckwheat (soba) noodles
  • a few handfuls of your favorite summer lettuce, torn
  • 4 small cucumbers, semi pealed (Persian cucumbers are my favorite)
  • 2 spring onions, chopped
  • 1 bunch cilantro, stems trimmed away
  • 2 handfuls of sunflower seeds
  • black and white sesame seeds
  • dash of pink salt
  • fresh cracked black pepper (optional)
  • For The Dressing
  • 1 tablespoon coconut oil
  • 1-2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 tablespoons almond butter
  • 2 tablespoons soba noodle water
  • 1 teaspoon gluten free tamari
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 lime

Instructions

  1. I run the purple cabbage through my spiralizer to slice it thin. Whatever way is best for you, slice it very thin. In the morning or night before, place the cabbage in a bowl and cover with vinegar. Set aside. If overnight, set in fridge.
  2. When you are ready to prepare your salad, prepare the noodles according to the instructions on the package. Drain, reserving a bit of water for your dressing. Put the noodles in a bowl with ice and set in your refrigerator to cool.
  3. Pour your cabbage with vinegar into your salad bowl and add the rest of the salad ingredients.
  4. Make the dressing by gently warming the coconut oil with the garlic. Once the garlic begins to sizzle, stir in the almond butter. Allow that to warm thoroughly for a minute or two, then add the soba noodle water and whisk well. Take off the heat. Stir in the tamari and then the olive oil. Add more soba noodle water to thin and get the consistency you need for a salad dressing.
  5. Pour over the salad and lightly toss. Finish by sprinkling the juice of one lime over the salad and again lightly tossing. Taste, adjust salt and pepper, and serve.
http://ayurvedanextdoor.com/cabbage-salad/

 

Yes, taste and adjust. My new motto for life.

The bright fuchsia and life-announcing green of this salad is so gorgeous. They were my favorite colors as a teenager so it was a perfect salad to celebrate the close of our week at camp, where all of us were reminded of our years as teens. At our Yoga and Ayurveda Camp for girls, we hope to make those years powerful, heart-centered and affirming by giving life mastery skills to our upcoming teens.

Sophia Camp

At the end of camp, the older girls posted to our Camp Blog a photo essay, and later a “music video” of their week, which you can view here.

Images: Laura Plumb and Food-ALoveStory.com